Dairy Allergies Discovered and Chronic Ear Infections Are Gone!

Our journey with dairy allergies, began rather sneakily as, unaware of any connection, we struggled to help our infant daughter fight her chronic ear infections.

Our daughter, AB, was ear-infection-free for the first nine months of her life. She breastfed well, loved to eat as she started solids, had a few viruses here and there but was healthy overall and showed no signs of allergies other than the seasonal ones that run in our family. We were thankful to have a healthy baby, of course, and even more thankful that AB did not inherit the reflux her father and brother both struggled with. She also did not get ear infections like her brother did (starting at 3 months), a fact I thought might be caused from her being breastfed (he was not). She pulled at her ears all the time and at her checkups always had a lot of fluid and wax in her ears, but no infections. At about nine months old, AB developed a love of yogurt, particularly yogurt melts and Gerber baby yogurt. Every day she had her yogurt and just devoured it. She was still nursing as well and I had cheese, milk, and the occasional ice cream. Still, I did not at all consider the increase in AB’s dairy intake as a factor when she got her first ear infection at almost-ten months. I had heard about a possible link between dairy allergies and ear infections as well as eczema and reflux (both of which my son had), but did not remember it when AB’s first ear infection was confirmed.

That first ear infection turned into either three ear infections or one very long ear infection – a few days after a complete round of antibiotics, I took an ill AB back to the doctor’s office where they confirmed an ear infection. Yet again, a few weeks later, we were back with another ear infection. After this (third) antibiotic, AB got a reprieve and was ear-infection free again for a couple months, but at every check-up she had fluid in her ears. The fourth time we journeyed to the doctor for an ear infection was shortly after she turned one and started drinking whole milk in addition to nursing. This infection set in motion an identical series of doctor and pharmacy adventures as the first. After the third antibiotic to clear the ears, the doctor referred us to an Ear Nose and Throat Doctor (ENT) for tubes. I was hesitant about getting tubes put in my daughter’s ears and not at all certain this was the route I wanted to go – afterall, who wants to undergo any surgery unless it’s 100% necessary, let alone put their baby under for surgery. So skeptical and nervous, I went to the ENT’s office hoping maybe he would offer an alternative or assure me of the surgery’s necessity.

milk products

By the time we saw the ENT, AB’s ears were finally no longer infected but did still have fluid in them. The ENT was patronizingly quick to blow off my questions and concerns, treating me as if I should just schedule the tubes and get it over with and quit bothering him and making me certain I would not have him operating on my daughter. He did, however, give me a glimmer of surgery-alternative-hope when he said that her infections were likely caused by a dairy allergy. This statement intrigued me, and I tried to steer the conversation back to that possibility. Again, he somewhat blew me off, saying that I could try a dairy-elimination diet if I wanted, but treating me as if he assumed I wouldn’t because it would be too inconvenient or too much hassle. I know, from talking to others, that for many people this is the case and, instead of trying to eliminate dairy, they just get tubes. But even if that had been my initial reaction (which it wasn’t), his attitude toward me triggered my stubbornness and I determined to show him I could and would accomplish going dairy-free. The ENT’s nurse was much kinder, gave me a packet of information on dairy-elimination diets, and explained the basics to me. My husband was on-board with the dairy-elimination as well and two days later, AB and I started our new dairy-free diet.

The diet was fairly simple, though it took some adjusting too – no dairy at all, even in baked or cooked foods, for three full months then, if the diet seemed successful (no new ear infections), slowly add back in a little dairy here and there to see what happens. Already a label-reader for nutrition, I began looking for dairy ingredients now as, often, they are not as obvious as one would think. I discovered all sorts of dairy-infused products like CoffeeMate, which states “Non-Dairy” on the label, and beef broth and French Onion soup – staples in my Au Jus. In fact, Au Jus itself is impossible to find dairy-free unless made from scratch. And of course there are baked goods, soups, breads, and other favorites that are all filled with dairy. Daycare found that most sandwich thins are dairy-free and bought AB those for sandwiches there, so I bought them at home. I found that Almond Milk worked best for AB and that I could replace her yogurt with Soy yogurt. I found substitutes for the dairy in most of my favorite recipes and, since my husband doesn’t care for cheese anyway, we began getting pizza with no cheese on it. I checked the websites for our favorite restaurants in advance to know what dairy-free offerings they had and, with the exception of the occasional sneaky-ingredient that we may have missed when eating out, AB and I went dairy-free and ear-infection free. A much smoother transition than any of us thought it would be.

Once three months had passed, I slowly added dairy back to my diet but not AB’s, figuring it would be safer for me to have it first and see how she handled what she was getting through breastmilk, than try to add to her diet. It took two weeks of small amounts of dairy on my part every day and one large Cold Stone Creamery ice cream while on vacation (I just couldn’t resist) and AB went back to the doctor with an ear infection. That was proof enough for me. Back to dairy-free we went. It’s been four months since then and no ear infections despite a couple of colds. Not only that, but I feel better, have more energy, and am losing weight (slowing, but steadily, which is great). I expected, or at least hoped for, the positive impact on AB, but not on me, and couldn’t be happier about it. There are rare occasions when we may have a small amount of dairy because we are eating out or at someone else’s house and are not certain of the ingredients, but we avoid the biggies – dairy milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, butter, and anything we know will contain any of these ingredients, and all our food at home is dairy-free. The holidays may be more difficult to stay dairy-free during, but we plan to do our best (and maybe I’ll avoid those extra holiday pounds because of it). I really can sing praises about being dairy-free. I know that there are nutritionists out there who strongly advise against dairy and, as better as I feel not having it, I can’t help but agree with them.

So, if any of you are struggling with ear infections, eczema, reflux, night-waking, or any other of the myriad of symptoms that a dairy allergy can cause (if you look up the list, it’s amazing), I would definitely recommend trying to go dairy-free. You may just be surprised at how easy it is and how much better it is for you. Of course, it is not a guarantee. Some children have ear infections, reflux, eczema, etc. for other reasons and a doctor should always be consulted, especially when, or in case, dairy-elimination does not work, as it does not always. Be warned though, many doctors poo-poo the dairy allergy link; mine did until AB became infection free than said “maybe the ENT has something there.” So, trust your instincts and get other opinions if need be. But certainly give dairy-elimination some thought.

Dairy photo from www.allergies-tips.com

About the Blogger: 

Hi! I’m Shawna, a married mother of two — one boy, one girl, who loves being a mom. My kids throw me for a loop sometimes with their surprises and life is always an adventure with little ones around, but I wouldn’t change it for anything.

“Itchy Spots” (or Eczema, as it is Called Elsewhere)

Four years ago, the extent of my knowledge regarding eczema was its existence as some kind of skin rash. Having worked with a person who had psoriasis, I somewhat (incorrectly) equated the two and felt bad for people who dealt with them but didn’t give them much thought myself. So, when my son had a circular patch of red, bumpy skin on his arm, I never considered eczema but thought it was ringworm. Daycare thought the same and the nurse at my son’s clinic confirmed the suspicion and said to use Lotrimin on the area. A few days of Lotrimin, however, brought about no change and my mother, a RN, was visiting, so I asked her opinion. She thought it looked like “contact eczema” and suggested we change laundry detergents.

This change seemed to do the trick at first, but it wasn’t long before what came to be called “itchy spots” in our house started popping up all over my son’s arms and legs and occasionally his back and stomach. All of these spots were circular in nature (similar to ringworm), not like the eczema photos I’d seen on posters in the doctor’s office, and daycare was concerned that this was some type of fungal infection and therefore contagious. So I did some research and saw a pediatrician and it turned out eczema appears in more than one form and the form my son had was Nummular Dermatitis or Nummular Eczema which is often misdiagnosed initially as ring-worm due to its circular appearance. So, no ringworm (phew), but still the unpleasant “itchy spots” remained. Typical eczema remedies – cortisone on the “itchy spots” when they were red and Aveeno when they were not, no use of soap (just Aveeno bath wash), free & clear laundry detergents, and no bubble bath became the routine at our house. Still, for a long time my son would go through periods where he had these horrible “itchy spots” that he would often pick at and worsen. The crease on the inside of his elbow was particularly bad and I had difficulty getting the eczema to clear from that area. Of course, this is also an easily accessible spot to itch, so I took to covering it with Band-aids to keep my son from picking at it.

ScratchingIn the meantime, I kept researching and came across a link between eczema and milk protein allergy. I spoke with the pediatrician about the possible connection between that two, but was told that it was unlikely and there was no proof of a connection (the same thing I was told about my son’s reflux and a possible milk allergy) and so, we just continued our “itchy spot” routine. It wasn’t until this year, as my son’s “itchy spots,” all-but disappeared and then were gone, that my daughter (who is eczema free) was diagnosed with a milk protein allergy. When we saw the specialist regarding this, the conversation with him resulted in the following conclusions:

1. According to the specialist, it was surprising that my daughter did not have eczema given the obvious milk protein allergy.

2. Milk protein allergies are often the cause of night-waking (something my son has always struggled with).

3. My son likely had a milk protein allergy which caused or at least aggravated his reflux and eczema and was no longer struggling with it because he had outgrown the allergy (as most children do by the time they are six) or reduced his milk intake to a level where it was not affecting him.

Having one of those, “if I had only known then” moments, I wished I had just taken my son off dairy a few years ago to see what happened despite the pediatrician’s assurance that a milk allergy was not likely. It certainly would’ve been nice to ascertain a connection between the two four years ago, but hindsight is always 20/20. Still, I would be curious to know how many out there have found an obvious connection between their child’s eczema and a food or other allergy. I also encourage any of you dealing with eczema to explore the possibility of it being caused from a food allergy – and follow your instinct even if your doctor says there is little chance…see a specialist or try eliminating dairy. It might be worth it.

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About the Blogger:

Hi! My name is Shawna. I am a married mother to two adorable children and love being a mom. My children throw me unexpected surprises more often than I can count, but I wouldn’t change that for the world. Thanks for reading!

Potty Training — What Worked For Me

When asked about potty training, I feel I should groan, sigh, and say, “Aww, potty-training,” as I have heard many do; but my experience so far does not warrant such a reaction. I realized when I started the process that, as with much of parenting choices, the method to use depends on the child/parent and what works for them. My plan was devised by taking snippets of the advice I’d been given, considering that whatever method we chose would have to work at daycare too, and putting it all together. Daycare had already begun to take my son (at two years old) to the bathroom every two hours to “try,” so, I took that idea and an observation that, in a friend’s experience, Pull-ups only delay the process, and formulated my plan. I waited until Thanksgiving break, stocked up on “big boy underwear” for daytime and Pull-ups for night, and bought some mini-M&Ms. I chose a stool and a toilet-seat insert instead of a potty chair because my son was tall for his age and this was actually easier for him (and less mess for me). We started sitting on the toilet right after waking up and then setting a timer for one hour later to try again. Each time he would go potty, he got two mini-M&Ms and the timer was set for one hour. If he did not go, he got a “good try” and the timer was set for 20 minutes. After the third time the timer went off, he had the routine down and even stopped in the middle of playing with Grandma to announce, “Oop, time for me to go potty.”

I was warned that often children catch on to peeing fairly quickly but take longer to learn to go “stinky” and, as such, I may want to rethink the straight-to-underwear plan. However, this was not the case for my son. I can still clearly see the two times that he went “stinky” in his underwear. In both cases, it was clear from the bulging underwear what had happened and, in both cases, he was immediately appalled. I know that this is one argument for Pull-ups – so that accidents are not upsetting to the child – and I can see the validity of that argument if a child continues to have accidents regularly. But for my son, it was exactly the getting upset over accidents that worked for him – he never had a third one. By the time he went to daycare five days after we had started, he was going “stinky” in the toilet every time, and by the end of week one, the timer was gone. Over the course of the first month, the wet accidents got fewer and fewer and by the time the third month past, they were all but non-existent. Seriously, quite easy. Of course, there was some patience required and I at first worried that giving M&Ms would turn into an expectation I would have to fight to break, but the concern was  invalid and after the first couple weeks, my son forgot about the M&Ms completely. We continued to use Pull-ups at night for about six months (until he consistently woke up dry), but I could not have been happier with how this process went for us. In fact, the only thing that didn’t work out was that the word “potty” – a word my husband and I abhorred and insisted we would never use – permanently made its way into my vocabulary and even that of my husbands (I still secretly smirk when one of us says “Do you need to go potty?” because we were once so adamant about never using that word).

I do admit that we probably got lucky in potty-training being so smooth a process, but I certainly won’t complain about that. Now, I’m potty-training number 2. She is a little peanut, so the toilet seat insert won’t work for her and I invested in a potty chair instead. Also, she could care less about the timer at the moment, but she is “trying” at daycare and occasionally at home, so soon I need to start encouraging her a little more – this time I might have that sighing and groaning experience others have had, but, of course, I’m hoping I do not.


About the Blogger: 

Hi! I’m Shawna. I am a married, working mom of two — one boy, one girl, who I love more than I could have every imagined. Parenting has not always been easy for me and my children throw plenty of unexpected surprises, but I wouldn’t trade that for anything.

Breastfeeding — How hard can it be?

That is what I thought after an expectant friend said she was worried about breastfeeding. “It’s how we were designed, what’s to worry about,” I thought. With that (vastly incorrect) outlook, I entered motherhood without considering breastfeeding except that it was “best,” “natural,” and I would do it. Oh, what I have learned!

  • Babies do not always “latch on” and eat – in fact, some, like my son, refuse to latch on but instead scream or, when they finally do latch on, fall asleep.
  • Babies don’t always wake to eat. After my son did not wake to eat his first night at home and into the morning, I called the nurse, who advised bringing him in. Not only had he developed jaundice in the 17 hours since we left the hospital, he had not eaten. Thus, based on the advice of the lactation consultant, I pumped milk, supplemented with formula, and worked on nursing will also finger-feeding him (use a thin tube attached to a feeding syringe filled with formula or breast milk and tape that tube to the finger, which the baby then sucks on to remove milk from the syringe).
  • Finger-feeding to avoid nipple confusion is not a guaranteed success. For the first few weeks, we woke our son every two hours to eat, requiring that we finger-feed him because he would not nurse or wake to eat and we were told giving him a bottle would cause nipple confusion. We now joke that instead of nipple confusion, he got “finger confusion.” For the first couple months, he wanted to suck on someone’s finger instead of a pacifier or bottle – fingers were more comforting/familiar to him.
  • Pumping milk for a baby who won’t nurse is not always possible because the pump does not always stimulate enough milk production.
  • Working with a lactation consultant is helpful and can work, but doesn’t always. The lactation consult gave us great advice, but it just did not work for our son.
  • Sometimes breastfeeding does not work, not for lack of trying or desire – some babies just will not breastfeed and some moms are just unable to do so and that is OKAY.
  • Not nursing when you so badly want to is a tough decision and can cause guilt. I was disappointed, felt guilty for giving up and being unprepared, and often wished I had tried longer. But, after a few weeks of waking my son every two hours, spending twenty minutes unsuccessfully trying to get him to nurse, then finger feeding him, then pumping what (very little) milk I could get so that I could feed him that, with formula, at the next feeding, then starting all over again thirty-forty minutes later plus fitting in trips to the lactation consultant and doctor, I reached my breaking point and, sobbingly, told my husband I could not do this anymore and wanted to just formula feed. He was supportive and we still had to wake our son regularly to eat for a short time, but he had a bottle and life was easier for all of us.
  • Just because one baby won’t nurse, does not mean others won’t. I talked to other moms who had a child who would not nurse and then had other children who nursed just fine. So, when I was pregnant with Baby #2, I decided I wanted to try nursing again after. I prepared myself better this time, but didn’t need to – she latched on twenty minutes after birth, nursed great, and is still nursing twice a day at twenty months. I was also able to return to work and pump three times a day while away from her until she was one, providing her with plenty of milk despite having been unable to pump more than a ½ ounce at a time with my son. Friends, colleagues and even family eye me suspiciously when I say she is still nursing or ask, “When are you going to wean her?” But, I am in no hurry to wean her yet. She seems to nurse less and less each day though and will, I think, wean herself before long.
  • Overall, breastfeeding is a wonderful experience and I would encourage anyone who wants to do so and can to breastfeed – but, it is not always easy and it does not always work and that is okay.

On a side note: our son, who would not wake to eat and when awake, often refused to eat, is now five and still does not like to eat – never has. Meals are always a battle and he would choose to go all day without eating if we let him. He is healthy and in the 75th percentile on the charts, he just does not like food (except fruit snacks and suckers). I maintain that this was the problem from day one – it wasn’t that he couldn’t nurse – he just didn’t like to eat.

 

Shawna’s beautiful daughter and son!

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About the Blogger:

Hi! I’m Shawna. I am a married, working mom of two — one boy, one girl, who I love more than I could have every imagined. Parenting has not always been easy for me and my children throw plenty of unexpected surprises, but I wouldn’t trade that for anything.